The world is a stage, but the play is badly cast.

24. Female. Chicago.

"To be nobody but yourself in a world which is doing its best, night and day, to make you everybody else means to fight the hardest battle which any human being can fight; and never stop fighting." - E. E. Cummings

buffbon:

This is ten percent luck, twenty percent skill, fifteen percent concentrated power of will, five percent pleasure, fifty percent pain, and a hundred percent reason to remember the name

buffbon:

This is ten percent luck, twenty percent skill, fifteen percent concentrated power of will, five percent pleasure, fifty percent pain, and a hundred percent reason to remember the name

airyairyquitecontrary:

stories-yet-to-be-written:

The Best Pictures Of This Year’s Japanese Cherry Blossoms

The Japanese cherry blossom, known as the Sakura in Japanese, is the flower of a cherry tree that is cultivated for its decorative features rather than for cherries (it doesn’t bear fruit). The overwhelming beauty of the cherry blossom bloom has been known and adored for ages. The blooming period is associated with Japanese traditions, culture, aesthetics, and is a bittersweet metaphor for the ephemeral nature of life itself.

The blooming cherry blossoms herald the beginning of the centuries-old Hanami festival – the traditional Japanese custom of picnicking under trees rich with flowering Sakura branches and enjoying this short but striking first breath of spring. The blossoming wave usually starts in Okinawa in January or February and progresses through all of Japan until April or May. The cherry blossom front (Sakura zensen) can be conveniently tracked every year using this calendar.

Source: Demilked Magazine

Plus, in case you ever wondered, the name for a cherry tree that does bear fruit in Japan is ‘sakuranbo.’ They also bloom, of course, because the flowers turn into the cherries, but their blossom isn’t as spectacular as the ones cultivated to produce non-fruiting flowers.

The hanami tradition began with blossoming plum (ume) trees, but at some point the tradition changed over to the more showy sakura. The sakura flower is used as a symbol of the samurai because, like the flower, he is prepared to fall at the time of his greatest vitality and beauty.

(Where old-ass grizzled samurai who have survived all their fights fit into this, I’m not quite sure.)

wrote-miss-ibis:

cellarspider:

lyricalred:

whiskyrunner:

Just a reminder:the natural diet of these birds is BONES. Not just bone marrow; actual bone shards. They pick up huge freaking bones from carcasses and drop them onto rocks until they get spiky pieces and then they swallow them. Their stomach acid dissolves bone.

look me in the eye and tell me that’s not a fucking dragon

And they aren’t naturally red like that. That’s self-applied makeup. They find the reddest earth they can to work into their feathers as a status symbol.

And they don’t scavenge other parts of carcases, just the bones. 85-90% of their diet is exclusively bone. Hence why it’s only a myth that these birds would just pick up whole lambs and carry them off. It’s not true, but in German they’re still called Lämmergeier as a result.

So metal